Skyfall

4.5 of 5

This past 2 years all eyes were on London. The royal wedding, the riot, the olympic, so it is no surprise that London also becomes the heart for the latest James Bond film.

I’d like to remind you that since Daniel Craig was casted as the infamous spy, he portrayed the beginnning of how Bond became 007. Yes, he has grown over the past 2 films, Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace. But he still has some rough patches here and there. He is not yet the sleek, calculated, captivating agent we all known. Just admit it, people… Our favourite spy is quite a psycho! Nobody gets out off conundrums perfectly stainless, both shirt and emotionally.

But anyway, Skyfall marks the 50 years celebration of James Bond. It does something that Sir Ian Fleming did not put in his Bond novels: giving personal closure to Bond so he can fully start his dashing debonair spy life. This film also makes more sense regarding Craig’s 2 Bond prequels on how they will connect with Connery’s Bond, thus perfecting the circle.

Javier Bardem as the villanous Raoul Silva appears psychopathically entertaining, almost as if he is the flamboyant version of Anton Chigurh (his character in No Country For Old Men). There is Naomie Harris as Eve, a rookie agent who loves a bit of rough housing and turns out to be a familiar character. Who else? The fantastic Mr. Ralph Fiennes playing the disciplined director of intelligence division, and Ben Whishaw as Q. Whishaw is the quirky contemporary Q, unfortunately that cute face will soon be full of wrinkles, thanks to Bond’s antics.

In the end, let’s us raise our glasses and toast that it has been 50 years of Bond. Hopefully, 50 years more.

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About landakungu (Dane Anwar)

Landakungu is the blog of Dane Anwar, a native Jakartan. She loves to travel, read comics, novels, and watch films. After spending 5 years living in Taiwan and 4 months in China, she is finally back in Indonesia, which is going to be her new base for more travels and other interestng things.
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